Conference program

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S58 Co-development of an innovative tool to support young children’s parents
Thursday (CST| HSC): 08:30-08:55 | Poster presentation
Primary care/population health | Child/youth

Béatrice Ouellet (Université Laval | Québec) beatrice.ouellet.1@ulaval.ca, Emmanuelle Careau Université Laval Emmanuelle.Careau@fmed.ulaval.ca, Marie Grandisson Université Laval marie.grandisson@fmed.ulaval.ca

Introduction: Children living in socioeconomically disadvantaged families are more at risk to have developmental problems (Boivin & Hertzman, 2012). Since family interactions and opportunities offered in living environments are known to strongly influence children’s development, interventions supporting families in the establishment of a stimulating environment are critically needed. Objectives: This study aimed to co-develop an educational tool on early childhood development that is accessible to all families, regardless of their socioeconomic status, and used in primary healthcare and community settings. The objectives were to determine which parents’ information needs should be addressed in priority and which format would be the most appropriate. Methods: Through two group work sessions structured with the Technique of Research of Information by Animation of a Group of Experts (Gervais & Pepin, 2002), eleven participants (parents, community workers, health professionals, managers) reached consensus regarding the information and the format of the tool. Results: In an attractive and useful format of a scale to measure the child’s height, this tool presents strategies to use in the daily routine to foster the development of the child’s autonomy in a pleasant way (e.g. at dinner time, ask your child to serve the meal in the plates: he can use different kitchen tools and be creative). Conclusions: This tool, as itself, could be useful to occupational therapists involved in early childhood development. Also, the process conducted to develop a tool adapted to socioeconomically disadvantaged families could inform occupational therapists on the particular things to consider when they intervene with them.


T97 The impact of depression among entrepreneurs: A scoping review
Thursday (CST| HSC): 08:30-08:55 | Poster presentation
Mental health | Community/population

Lauren Cubbon (University of Alberta | Bathurst, NB) cubbon@ualberta.ca, Kristin Darga Impact Founder kdarga@impactfounder.com, Uira Duarte Wisnesky University of Alberta duartewi@ualberta.ca, Liz Dennett University of Alberta liz.dennett@ualberta.ca, Christine Guptill University of Alberta guptill@ualberta.ca

Introduction: Entrepreneurial work can be challenging, including financial dependence on both the success of the venture and the continued work ability and well-being of the founder. Popular media suggests that entrepreneurs are at increased risk of suicide; however, the research literature addressing this risk is unclear. Accordingly, this study aims to explore what is known about depression and suicide among entrepreneurs. Objectives: To introduce occupational therapists and scholars to the mental health challenges experienced by entrepreneurs. Methods: Scoping review and thematic synthesis of the findings. Results: Thirty-five articles fit the criteria and corresponded to four overarching themes: Social relations, Personal factors, work characteristics, and mental health. Each theme contains sub-themes regarding the psychological impact of entrepreneurial work. Conclusions: This review demonstrates the variety of factors that impact an entrepreneur’s mental health. These include personal factors such as gender, personality traits, and routine. Other factors include the high time demands, putting entrepreneurs at risk for social isolation and relationship strain. These may result in feelings of failure and shame, while stigma and a need to project a positive brand identity may prevent entrepreneurs from seeking the help that they need. Together, these factors contribute to a risk of depression and suicide. Occupational therapists, whose scope of practice includes enabling productivity, can play an important role in recognition, prevention and treatment of depression and suicide in entrepreneurs.


T49 Family resilience-building programs among military and veteran families
Thursday (CST| HSC): 08:30-08:55 | Poster presentation
Mental health | Child/youth

Suzette Bremault-Phillips (University of Alberta | Edmonton) suzette2@ualberta.ca, Joanne Olson University of Alberta, Phillip Sevigny University of Alberta, Ashley Pike University of Alberta

Introduction: Military families experience unique stressors including frequent moves, separation, and deployment of parent/spouse to hostile environments. Occupational Therapists can support military members and their families to manage such stressors and holistically build resilience. Two promising resilience programs for use by Occupational Therapists are Reaching In...Reaching Out (RIRO) and Bounce Back and Thrive! (BBT). RIRO and BBT focus on enhancing family relationships by equipping service providers and parents with thinking styles and practical skills that enable them to model resilience to children 0-8 years of age. Objective: Evaluate the applicability of RIRO and BBT for Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) military and veteran families (MVFs). Method: Qualitative focus group data was collected by an Occupational Therapist from service and healthcare providers and a military couple following 5-day Intensive RIRO and BBT training. Participants were asked about the applicability of RIRO and BBT for MVFs and recommendations regarding contextualization. Result: Participants indicated that RIRO and BBT content is relevant to MVF, but lacked specificity. Program contextualization would need to include MVF examples and metaphors, presentation of deployment realities, and clarification of different resilience-skills needed in the family versus deployment contexts. Supporting resilience-building among military families also requires awareness of the realities and strengths of military families, and the stressors they are more likely to face. Conclusion: Resilience is needed to enable military families to thrive amidst various stressors associated with military life. Occupational Therapists are uniquely equipped to support a holistic and family-centred understanding of resiliency.


T18 Alberta Rating Index for Apps (ARIA): A reliability study
Thursday (CST| HSC): 10:00-10:25 | Paper presentation
General/professional issues | Adult

Peyman Azad Khaneghah (University of Alberta | Edmonton) azadkhan@ualberta.ca, Mary Roduta Roberts University of Alberta mary.roberts@ualberta.ca, Eleni Stroulia University of Alberta stroulia@ualberta.ca, Martin Ferguson-Pell University of Alberta martin.ferguson-pell@ualberta.ca, Lili Liu University of Waterloo lili.liu@uwaterloo.ca,

Introduction: There are more than 300,000 mobile health apps available through Google Play and iTunes. Many of these apps, have low quality, may not be useful, or may be unsafe for end-users. It is a challenge for patients, family caregivers, and mental healthcare providers to identify apps with acceptable quality. Existing app quality rating scales are either too complex or do not include all relevant criteria. We have created a rating index that can be used by patients, family caregivers, and health care professionals to identify apps that demonstrate acceptable or high quality based on a set of validated criteria. Objectives: To determine the inter-rater reliability of the new Alberta Rating Index for Apps (ARIA), with a focus on mental health apps. Methods: Four occupational therapists, four older adults, and four adults living with mental health conditions rated the quality of 11 mental health apps using ARIA. A one facet generalizability study (i.e., Apps x Raters) was completed for each group. A generalizability co-efficient (G) was calculated as a measure of inter-rater reliability. Results: The G-coefficients calculated based on the total index scores were 0.948 for occupational therapists, 0.829 for older adults, and 0.876 for adults living with mental health conditions. The results indicated the ARIA has a high inter-rater reliability. Ratings provided by the occupational therapist group were more reliable. Conclusion: The Alberta Rating Index for Apps has high inter-rater reliability when used by a small group of occupational therapists, older adults, and adults living with mental health conditions.


T21 Contextual strategies to support social inclusion in childhood
Thursday (CST| HSC): 10:00-10:25 | Paper presentation
Environment | Child/youth

Brydne Edwards, Debra Cameron, Gillian King, Amy A. McPherson

Rationale: Experiencing inclusion has significant social and psychological benefits for children with and without disabilities. Although integrating children with and without disabilities in recreation programs is assumed to promote inclusion, how social inclusion is facilitated in recreation settings from the perspective of children is not fully known. Objective: The objective was to identify how social inclusion is fostered in a recreation program to support meaningful aspects of social inclusion from the perspectives of children with and without disabilities. Methods: Researchers adopted a generic qualitative methodology. Seventeen children between the age of eight and 17 years with and without disabilities who were registered for the same recreation program were recruited. Two semi-structured interviews and three, two-hour observation periods were conducted with each participant. Inductive thematic analysis was used to analyze interview and observation data. Results: Five strategies were identified that support meaningful aspects of social inclusion from participants’ perspectives: a) creating opportunities for children to communicate their interests and desires; b) providing opportunities to choose self-directed activities; c) strategically selecting and placing objects to support interactions between children with and without disabilities; d) directly encouraging interactions between children with and without disabilities, and; e) Having relatively equal numbers of children with and without disabilities. Conclusions: This study facilitates a better understanding of how meaningful inclusion experiences can be facilitated in recreation settings. By understanding how to facilitate inclusion in these shared spaces, clinicians can develop a better understanding of ways they can support the psychosocial wellbeing of their paediatric clients and their families.


T22 Indigenous occupational and physical therapy student experiences
Thursday (CST| HSC): 10:00-10:25 | Paper presentation
Education | Adult

Cara Brown (University of Manitoba | Winnipeg) cara.brown@umanitoba.ca, Debra Beech-Ducharme University of Manitoba, Gayle Restall University of Manitoba, Nichol Marsch University of Manitoba, Danielle Peebles Winnipeg Regional Health Authority, Kimberly Hart University of Manitoba, Moni Fricke University of Manitoba, Jacquie Ripat University of Manitoba, Indigenous Health Research Cluster College of Rehabilitation Sciences University of Manitoba

Background: The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada calls on universities to increase the number of Canadian Indigenous health professionals (Truth and Reconciliation Commission Call to Action #23). Indigenous university students face barriers to attaining their education, including racism. However, there is little known about the personal experiences of Indigenous occupational and physical therapy students. Objectives: Develop an in-depth understanding of the experiences of Indigenous students in entry-level occupational and physical therapy programs. Learn how programs can support Indigenous student success in relation to student recruitment, admission processes, and retention. Methods: We used narrative inquiry to elicit the personal stories of Indigenous students. They were interviewed by an Indigenous research assistant not directly affiliated with the program. Participants were invited to share their stories of learning about, applying to, and being a student in their program. The interviewer probed for more specific information as stories unfolded. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed inductively using a re-storying approach. Results: The First Nations and Métis participants all reported that navigating the admission process was not difficult. However, that is where the similarity between the experiences of the participants ended. Variation was noted among students in regards to attaining pre-requisite course requirements, feeling safe in the classroom, in finding or maintaining their Indigenous identity, and in the extent of their support networks. Conclusions: The diverse experiences of the students in this study highlight the importance of establishing a relationship with each student in order to address their individual, unique needs.


T19 Occupational therapy within the Canadian Armed Forces and Veteran populations: Practice and research
Thursday (CST| HSC): 10:00-10:55 | Extended discussion
Advocacy /policy development | Community/population

Chelsea Jones (Department of National Defense, Heroes in Mind Advocacy and Research Consortium (HiMARC), University of Alberta | Edmonton) cweiman@ualberta.ca, Marie-France Lebeau Department of National Defense marie-france.lebeau@forces.gc.ca, Suzette Bremault-Phillips Heroes in Mind Advocacy and Research Consortium (HiMARC), University of Alberta suzette2@ualberta.ca

Introduction: Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) Service Members (SMs), Veterans, and their families face transitions during their career and lifetime. Occupational therapists (OTs), with a rich history of working with SMs and Veterans, help healthy, ill and injured members to function optimally in the course of their service, as well as during relocation, promotions, employment challenges, rehabilitation, and the transition to civilian life. Recently, there is an increased presence of OTs within the CAF, Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC), universities, and community working and conducting research with this population. The need still exists to educate external stakeholders and the OT community on the contributions of our profession remains. Objectives: To heighten awareness of the progress, experiences, strengths, and barriers of OTs working and conducting research with this population. Approach: Presentations by 6 to 8 OTs panellists representing the CAF, VAC, and key research initiatives on (1) OT positions and programming within CAF/VAC, and; (2) an overview of Canadian OT research with these populations, followed by a facilitated group discussion. Practice Implications: It is imperative that the OT community be engaged with and knowledgeable about the strengths and challenges CAF-SMs, Veterans, and their families face and be informed about best practices and evidence-based interventions utilized by experienced OTs working with these populations. Conclusion: Canadian OTs play a vital role in the lives of CAF-SMs, Veterans, and their families. Further research, advocacy, and engagement with stakeholders will pave the way for enhanced utilization of OT within the CAF, VAC, and community.


T23 Building capacity in occupational therapy in the area of homelessness
Thursday (CST| HSC): 10:00-10:55 | Extended discussion
Mental health | Community/population

Carrie Anne Marshall (Western University | London, ON) carrie.marshall@uwo.ca, Rebecca Gewurtz McMaster University gewurtz@mcmaster.ca, Laurence Roy McGill University laurence.roy@mcgill.ca, Skye Barbic University of British Columbia skye.barbic@ubc.ca, Caitlin Ross Vancouver Island Health Authority caitlin.ross@viha.ca, Alyssa Becker becker.alyssa@queensu.ca, Abrial Cooke Western University acooke24@uwo.ca, Rosemary Lysaght Queen's University lysaght@queensu.ca, Bonnie Kirsh University of Toronto bonnie.kirsh@utoronto.ca

Introduction: Homelessness is growing worldwide, and an increasing number of occupational therapists are supporting persons experiencing or at risk of homelessness in their practice. Objectives: In this session, we will: 1) Present a framework developed to guide occupational therapists working in the housing and homelessness sector; and 2) Discuss the competencies needed for occupational therapists to support persons experiencing homelessness. Methods: We will present foundational research completed by our team in three phases. Phase I: We conducted a qualitative study to explore the priorities of homeless persons across the trajectory of homeless to housed. Phase II: Phase I findings were used to develop a framework to guide the practice of occupational therapists providing support to homeless persons. Phase III: We conducted two Delphi studies. The first introduced the framework to international occupational therapy researchers and practitioners. Feedback provided by these stakeholders was incorporated into a revised framework. A second Delphi focused on the competencies needed for occupational therapists to support those experiencing homelessness. Practice Implications: Findings of our research will be used in this presentation to engage attendees in a rich discussion regarding occupational therapy research and practice in the area of homelessness and identify future directions for building capacity in the occupational therapy profession. Conclusions: Occupational therapists offer a unique and important perspective on homelessness. There is a need to conduct larger scale research in occupational therapy and evaluate practice tools and interventions to guide therapists serving the needs of a growing population of homeless persons.


T24 Integrating occupational therapist assistants: Understand the process
Thursday (CST| HSC): 10:00-10:55 | Extended discussion
Primary care/population health | Community/population

Heather Gillespie (Medicine Hat College | Nanaimo, BC) harmonyis@shaw.ca

Introduction: The benefit of integrating occupational therapist assistants (OTAs) is demonstrating clients’ ability to better access and benefit from occupational therapy in both the public and private sectors. Concurrently, there continues to be a lack of understanding by many occupational therapists as to determining competence of OTAs, which in turn affects task assignment and supervision. As stated by Nancarrow and Mackey in 2005, “occupational therapists do not automatically have the skills to supervise support staff.” This was reinforced by Francis in her 2015 study as she reports “a tacit knowledge gap pertaining to the collaborative roles of therapists and assistants”. Objectives: At the end of this session, participants will describe how to develop a trusting relationship between occupational therapists and OTAs, and therapists will demonstrate applying a decision making process to help determine assignment and appropriate supervision. Approach: Therapist assistant education and accreditation will be briefly discussed as well as provincial regulatory requirements for OTA supervision. Small groups will then review case studies using a decision making tool to determine risks associated with assignment, and establish appropriate supervision if the task is assigned. Each group will then report back to the larger group with opportunity for further discussion. Practical Implications: The opportunity to review realistic case studies with colleagues (therapists and OTAs) that replicate potential situations within the work environment will assist in better understanding this collaboration. Conclusion: This interactive discussion will enable participants to improve confidence in teamwork between therapists and assistants, and to clarify the variables that determine type and frequency of supervision.


T30 Role of technology in chronic pain management of older adults
Thursday (CST| HSC): 10:30-10:55 | Paper presentation
Environment | Older Adult

Abhinayaa Jeyapragash (University of Toronto | Toronto) abhinayaa.jeyapragash@mail.utoronto.ca, Thusanthy Gunaseelan University of Toronto thusanthy.gunaseelan@mail.utoronto.ca, Arlene Astell University Health Network - Toronto Rehabilitation Institute arlene.astell@utoronto.ca, Shital Desai York University desais@yorku.ca, Cathleen Edwards University Health Network - Toronto Rehabilitation Institute cathleen.edwards@uhn.ca,

Introduction: Chronic pain (CP) is a pervasive condition that is most prevalent in older adults. Technological advances have opened new avenues for occupational therapists (OTs) to support older adults’ self-management of their physical and cognitive health. Further exploration is required to understand the barriers and facilitators that older adults and occupational therapists face in the use of technology for CP management in older adults. OTs would benefit from this knowledge when devising a CP management plan. Objectives: The purpose of this study is to understand the experiences of older adults and OTs in using technology to manage CP. Methods: This study employs a qualitative descriptive design. A total of 20 participants (14 older adults with CP, 6 OT) will be divided into two groups. Each group will be invited to participate in an interactive workshop using Show and Tell and Technology Interaction, two of the methods from Tools for User Needs Gathering to Support Technology Engagement (TUNGSTEN). The workshops will be video, and audio recorded for transcription and analysis. A thematic analysis of transcriptions and field notes will be conducted using NVivo and Observer XT to explore the technological barriers and facilitators as experienced by older adults and OTs. Practice Implications: Anticipated results will inform about the technological needs of older adults and ways in which technologies can be incorporated by OTs for CP management. Conclusions: Findings from this study will help OTs in developing an appropriate technology enabled care plan for older adults for CP management.


T32 Mental health and employment – who chooses work integration social enterprise?
Thursday (CST| HSC): 10:30-10:55 | Paper presentation
Participation and inclusion | Non-specific to Client Group

Rosemary Lysaght (Queen's University | Kingston, ON) lysaght@queensu.ca, Agnieszka Fecica Queen's University a.fecica@queensu.ca, Kathy Brock Queen's University kathy.brock@queensu.ca, Kelley Packalen Queen's University kelley.packalen@queensu.ca, Lori Ross University of Toronto l.ross@utoronto.ca,

Introduction: Social enterprises that focus on workforce integration (WISEs) offer a number of economic and social benefits to communities. They also provide a work entry option for people from marginalized populations, including people with serious mental illness (1,2). Objectives: This presentation reports findings from a study that examines the health, social and economic outcomes experienced by people with serious mental illness who choose WISE employment. Methods: The quantitative element of this before-and after study consists of data on a range of social indicators for both new and long-term WISE workers, as well as limited qualitative data. First round data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, and provide insight into the population characteristics of persons who choose WISE as a point of work entry, and those who remain in WISE for ongoing employment. Results: WISE workers demonstrate multiple barriers on all social indicators, and often a pattern of fractured employment and disengagement. Many have a number of assets, however, and choose WISE for a variety of reasons. Some distinctions were observed between short and long-term employees. Conclusion: Social enterprises employ a mixed population of persons living with serious mental illness. Awareness of the population characteristics of those who choose WISE will help occupational therapists better understand person-environment-fit as it may apply to the WISE context. It may also assist therapists as they guide clients in the vocational decision-making process.


S54 Effectiveness and impact of a supported work/study program for youth
Thursday (CST| HSC): 11:00-11:25 | Paper presentation
Mental health | Child/youth

Skye Barbic (University of British Columbia | Vancouver) skye.barbic@ubc.ca, Catherine Backman University of British Columbia, William q Honer University of British Columbia, Steve Mathias

Introduction: A critical mass of knowledge has accumulated to support the role of employment and education as social factors in determining the health of Canadians. This is notably true for the 1 in 4 Canadian young people aged 15 to 29 years who are diagnosed with a mental illness each year. Yet, the evidence base for effective interventions to support young people with mental illness to improve health outcomes through engagement in employment or education is to date underdeveloped. Objective: To measure the effectiveness of a 16-week youth-centered intervention: Youth Breakthrough to Employment and Training (Y-BEAT). Methods: This study was a mixed methods study and a prospective cohort design was used. Measures included employment/education >30 days, symptomology, recovery, and quality of life. Complete assessments took place at baseline, 5 weeks (end of Phase 1 intervention), 16 weeks (end of Phase 2 intervention), and at 6 and 12 months post-intervention. Focus groups with a subset of young people were conducted to generate descriptions of participant experiences in the intervention. Results: A total of 18 cohorts of young people participated in the intervention (total 155 youth, mean age 21, SD=2.2). Employment/education was achieved by 71% of participants, with 55% maintaining the outcome at 1 year, with 90% of participants showing improvement on recovery and mental health outcomes and overall strong satisfaction with the intervention. Conclusion: The results support a well-tested, widely applicable intervention tailored for young people with mental illness to improve health outcomes by increasing participation in employment or education.


T40 Public safety personnel workplace reintegration program: Analysis of facilitator training
Thursday (CST| HSC): 11:00-11:25 | Paper presentation
Mental health | Community/population

Chelsea Jones (Heroes in Mind Advocacy and Research Consortium (HiMARC), University of Alberta | Edmonton) cweiman@ualberta.ca, Liana Lentz Heroes in Mind Advocacy and Research Consortium (HiMARC), University of Alberta llentz@ualberta.ca, Ashley Pike University of Alberta apike@ualberta.ca, Suzette Bremault-Phillips Heroes in Mind Advocacy and Research Consortium (HiMARC), University of Alberta suzette2@ualberta.ca

Introduction: Occupational stress injuries (OSIs) can leave public safety personnel (PSP), including municipal police, firefighters, emergency medical workers, corrections officers, dispatchers, Canadian Border Patrol, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, etc., unable to return to work in their required capacity or at all. The goal of the Workplace Reintegration Program is to assist PSP return to work at full capacity as soon as possible after an OSI, while diminishing the potential for long-term psychological injury.1 To prepare PSP peers to deliver this program, a 5-day Workplace Reintegration Program Facilitator Training (WRPFT) course was offered to PSP agencies across Canada and New Zealand. Objective: To measure changes in mental health knowledge, attitudes, and learning within PSPs attending the WRPFT. Methods: Through this pre/post mixed-methods cohort pilot study, participant (n=150) data was collected during 5 cohorts of WRPFTs. Questionnaires included pre/post competency surveys, Mental Health Knowledge Questionnaires (MAKS),2 Open-Minds Survey of Workplace Attitudes questionnaires (OMSWA),3 and World Cafes pre/post and at 6-months. Descriptive statistics (ANOVA and paired-sample t-tests) were utilized to compare pre/post scores. Summaries of the World Cafe were thematically analyzed. Results: Statistically significant changes in pre/post questionnaire scores indicating a change in mental health knowledge and stigma. Emerging themes include culture change, organizational trust, peer support, and organizational engagement. Conclusion: The WRPFT appears to be successful at changing mental health attitudes, knowledge, and stigma in the workplace amongst PSP. Future research into return-to-work initiatives with longitudinal observation is warranted.


T41 Co-designing an e-mental health app for first responders
Thursday (CST| HSC): 11:00-11:25 | Paper presentation
Mental health | Adult

Sandra Moll (McMaster University | Hamilton) molls@mcmaster.ca, Rebecca Gewurtz McMaster University gewurtz@mcmaster.ca, Charlene O'Connor Homewood Research Institute coconnor@homewoodhealth.com, Kim Slade Public Services Health & Safety Association kslade@pshsa.ca, Margaret McKinnon Homewood Research Institute & McMaster University MMcKinnon@homewoodhealth.com,

Introduction: First responders (police, fire, paramedics, corrections) have an elevated risk of post-traumatic stress injury, but many do not recognize the warning signs of mental injury or receive the support they need in a timely way. E-mental health apps can overcome barriers to help-seeking, but need to consider the unique needs of potential end users. Methods: Best practice principles of co-design informed development of a new smartphone app to promote early intervention and peer support among first responders who are at risk for post-traumatic stress injury. Ten key informant interviews and four sets of initial and follow-up focus groups were conducted with a purposive sample of 46 firefighters, police, paramedics, and correctional workers across Ontario. Qualitative data regarding key issues and preferred features of the app informed technical development. Eight weeks of beta testing was conducted with 20 first responders to track patterns of app use, user experience, and perceived impact. Results: The co-design process led to identification of a set of design principles, mental health touchpoints, and a prioritized list of app features. These findings informed the next step of storyboarding with each first responder group to map user flow within the app, and to create ‘peer wisdom’ content. Differences were noted both within and across the four user groups, including distinctions between new and experienced workers. Conclusions: Active engagement of first responders throughout the app development process was not only critical for creating relevant content, but also for optimizing implementation and outcomes.


T43 Engaging youth with persistent pain to improve youth-oriented resources
Thursday (CST| HSC): 11:00-11:25 | Paper presentation
Participation and inclusion | Child/youth

Kristy Wittmeier (University of Manitoba | Winnipeg) kwittmeier@hsc.mb.ca, Cara Brown University of Manitoba cara.brown@umanitoba.ca, Kerstin Gerhold University of Manitoba kerstin.gerhold@chrim.ca, Gayle Restall Universi gayle.restall@umanitoba.ca, Heidi Pylypjuk University of Manitoba HPylypjuk@chrim.ca, Francis Dias University of Manitoba diazfa3@myumanitoba.ca

Background: Persistent pain affects about 5% of all children and adolescents, and is associated with severe restrictions in daily occupations. In a research engagement workshop hosted by a multidisciplinary team affiliated with the local pediatric pain clinic, youth with persistent pain and their families identified two pressing concerns: i) a lack of educational resources for patients and families, and ii) youth with persistent pain feeling isolated. Objective: To engage youth living with persistent pain in reviewing and recommending resources to use within the pain clinic and on the clinic website. Methods: Mixed methods instrumental case study design. Seven youth (aged 13 to 19) participated in a Youth Council for 2 x 5-hour workshops. Youth rated print and online resources using standardized and youth-friendly evaluation methods. Pre- and post-workshop interviews were conducted to understand the impact of project participation, evaluate the engagement strategy, and identify priorities for future research. Results: Resources were rated more favourably when they accurately depicted the youth’s experiences, were based on experiences of other youth and were tailored to a youth audience. Youth were sensitive to language, reacting negatively to resources that oversimplified the recovery process. Youth identified a need for resources that support communication about pain between youth, teachers and parents. The Youth Council Format allowed youth to explore and learn about new resources for pain management, while cultivating a sense of belonging. Conclusion: Engaging youth with persistent pain is an important process to ensure resources targeted to them are acceptable and valuable to them.


T44 Knowledge gaps in Indigenous health: Moving towards cultural humility
Thursday (CST| HSC): 11:00-11:25 | Paper presentation
General/professional issues | Non-specific to Client Group

Kassi Fritz (Sault Area Hospital | Sault Ste. Marie), Claire Jacek The Arthritis Society, Monique Lizon Canadian Mental Health Association Waterloo Wellington

Introduction: The Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) report outlines calls to action needed to work towards reconciliation with Indigenous peoples. The occupational therapy (OT) profession must take action to respond to the TRC. In order to do so, OTs must identify and address personal knowledge gaps, and practice with cultural humility when working with Indigenous peoples. Objectives: 1) To determine the knowledge gaps of OTs about Indigenous health; and 2) to create recommendations for the OT profession to address the identified knowledge gaps. Methods: Data from a national survey of Canadian OTs will be analyzed to determine knowledge gaps. Qualitative data will be analyzed using thematic analysis (Braun & Clark, 2006). Quantitative data analysis will be completed using descriptive statistics. Results: Qualitative data will be organized using a culturally responsive caring model (Muñoz, 2007) as a theoretical scaffold. Quantitative and qualitative data will highlight the knowledge gaps and institutional factors that impact practice with Indigenous peoples. Conclusions: The results of this project will determine recommendations for the OT profession to address the knowledge gaps of Canadian OTs in Indigenous health. It will further provide OTs with tangible actions that are in alignment with the TRC calls to action. The findings will provide insight into how OTs can participate in reconciliation using a cultural humility approach in practice.


S35 Training persons with disabilities to facilitate use of public transportation
Thursday (CST| HSC): 13:00-13:25 | Paper presentation
Participation and inclusion | Adult

Philippe Archambault (McGill University | Montreal) philippe.archambault@mcgill.ca, Jean-François Filiatrault Université de Montréal, Normand Boucher Université Laval, Isabelle Gélinas McGill University, Claire Croteau McGill University,

Introduction. In many cities, individuals with disabilities have access to adapted transportation services. These services have drawbacks, such as long waiting times and the necessity for advance scheduling. For this reason, public transit organizations such as Société de Transport de Montréal (STM), have worked toward improving the accessibility of their bus and metro systems. In addition, STM recently created a training program to improve use of their bus and metro services by people with disabilities. Objective. Our objectives were to determine if, for individuals with mobility limitations, 1) the training program’s contents were perceived as useful; and 2) the training program could facilitate use of public transport services. Methods. For the first objective, the training program was pilot tested by individuals with mobility limitations and reviewed by a group of experts. For objective 2, 12 adults with mobility limitation participated in the training program, which included courses and practical trials (bus and metro). Participants were then asked to travel at least 12 times by bus/metro over a three-month period and were interviewed about their experience. Results. In objective 1, participants largely validated the content of the STM’s training program and made suggestions, that were then incorporated. In objective 2, participants confirmed that the training program improved both quality and quantity of their public transport use. Conclusions. This study confirms the importance, for individuals with mobility limitations, of having access to multiple transportation alternatives (bus, metro, adapted transport) as well as the usefulness of a public transit training program for social inclusion.


T58 CAOT-BC
Thursday (CST| HSC): 13:00-13:25 | Paper presentation
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Tanya Fawkes-Kirby (CAOT-BC) tfkirby@caot.ca Sarah Charles scharles@caot.ca

Join CAOT-BC staff Tanya Fawkes-Kirby and Sarah Charles for an update and interactive discussion on BC Chapter activities, advocacy initiatives, promotion and representation events and member benefits. Bring your questions, comments and ideas!


T57 Serving people with autism spectrum disorder
Thursday (CST| HSC): 13:00-14:55 | Professional issue forum
General/professional issues | Non-specific to Client Group

Michèle L. Hébert (University of Calgary | Buds in Bloom) Louise Burridge (Louise Burridge, Therapy Ltd) Jonathan Lai

Occupational therapists offer a wide range of services to help children and adults with autism spectrum disorder realize their full potential in daily occupational engagement and performance. Unfortunately, funding and access to occupational therapy, are inconsistent per provincial jurisdiction, and far too often suboptimal in our country.

A Professional Issue Forum on the experiences and perceptions of occupational therapists delivering services to people or individuals with autism spectrum disorder in each of the Canadian provinces and territories is timely to achieve the following goals:
• Collect enriched perspectives of occupational therapy and access across the country;
• Define the ideal positioning of occupational therapy in the continuum of care for people or individuals with autism spectrum disorder;
• Identify resources that are required to achieve this ideal vision for practice;
• Propose key advocacy actions for individual occupational therapists and the Association over the next five years.


F63 Evidence for pre-printing development and intervention: A Scoping Review
Thursday (CST| HSC): 13:30-13:55 | Poster presentation
Theory | Child/youth

Erin Klein (University of British Columbia | Vancouver) erin.klein@alumni.ubc.ca, Ivonne Montgomery imontgomery@cw.bc.ca, Jill G. Zwicker Jill.zwicker@ubc.ca

Introduction: Occupational therapists often address pre-printing skills in young children, but the evidence supporting such practice has not been thoroughly investigated. Objectives: The purpose of this scoping review was to summarize and evaluate pre-printing literature, in an effort to gather evidence for intervention effectiveness for pre-printing skill development and outline a theoretical framework to inform best practice. Methods: Utilizing PRISMA guidelines and scoping review methodology (Levac et al., 2010), two independent reviewers selected articles for abstract and full-text review and rated the level of evidence of each article. Results: Most of the 142 articles that were included were at the lowest level of evidence, usually based on “expert” opinion. Few studies rigorously evaluated pre-printing interventions. Two theoretical approaches emerged based on pre-printing skill prerequisites and development. Occupational therapy research appears to follow a neuropsychological/ behavioural approach, which describes a prescriptive developmental sequence, leading to mastery of pre-printing shapes/strokes and skills. Direct instruction is recommended, to ensure children master these pre-printing skills. An emergent literacy/constructivist approach is prominent in education literature, which denotes fluid sequential development of pre-printing. This approach encourages children to experiment with printing following their natural printing development, without prescriptive mastery of certain skills. Conclusions: There is a need for more experimental design research to evaluate pre-printing skill development and intervention to inform best practice. Evidence from this study will be used to develop a pre-printing program. A combined theoretical approach that promotes natural printing development but ensures specific skills are taught may assist with printing readiness.


T10 Vocational characteristics of youth with disabilities transitioning to adult care
Thursday (CST| HSC): 13:30-13:55 | Poster presentation
Rehabilitation | Child/youth

Priscilla Leung (University of Toronto) priscillapy.leung@mail.utoronto.ca, Stephanie Seilman University of Toronto stephanie.seilman@mail.utoronto.ca, Sarah Munce Toronto Rehabilitation Institute - University Health Network Sarah.Munce@uhn.ca

Rationale: Individuals with disabilities are disproportionately unemployed and face discrimination when securing employment. A transitional service program, formed as a partnership between a pediatric and adult rehabilitation hospital in an urban Canadian city, uses an interdisciplinary delivery model for individuals with childhood-onset disabilities as they transition from pediatric to adult health systems. This service offers vocational rehabilitation, which provides education and job skills training to enhance clients’ employability. Objectives: The primary study objective is to determine the vocational, social engagement, and health-related quality of life outcomes of individuals with cerebral palsy and childhood onset acquired brain injury who use this transitional service. The secondary aim is to examine the possible associations between the demographic and clinical and vocational characteristics (e.g., volunteer status, employment status) of clients who use this service. Methods: 50-60 current participants will complete a cross-sectional online questionnaire. Demographic information, clinical information and vocational characteristics will be collected. The questionnaire will use items from the Community Integration Questionnaire and Health Related Quality of Life Short Form-12 Health Survey. Descriptive analysis, Chi-squared tests, t-tests and analysis of variance will be used to analyze the data. Results: The anticipated findings will reveal the vocational characteristics of participants of the current transitional service. Conclusions: As there has been limited studies on the impact of vocational programming provided by transitional services, the findings may be used to inform and further develop holistic vocational rehabilitation programs for young adults with neurological conditions and other disabilities.


T58B CAOT-North
Thursday (CST| HSC): 13:30-13:55 | Paper presentation
|

Wade Scoffin (CAOT-North) wscoffin@caot.ca

Join staff from CAOT chapters who will discuss highlights of the past year, plans for the upcoming year and respond to questions about the chapter model of regional-national representation.


T66 Supervising students with disabilities in fieldwork: Disclosure, distrust and dedication
Thursday (CST| HSC): 13:30-13:55 | Paper presentation
Education | Adult

Jen Davis (Dalhousie University | Halifax) jen.davis@dal.ca

Introduction: The occupational therapy profession in Canada has recently taken an explicit, strong stance, affirming that people with disabilities have the right to equitable participation in occupational therapy education. Though research evidence is not plentiful, studies from the perspectives of students and clinicians with disabilities show consistently that although students with disabilities may be entering health professions programs including occupational therapy in ever greater numbers, their progress through those programs is fraught with difficulties. Challenges particularly seem to arise during fieldwork, yet little is known about the experiences of preceptors. Objectives: The objective of this qualitative study was to understand the lived experience of occupational therapists who have supervised occupational therapy students with disabilities in a fieldwork setting. Methods: Using Qualitative Interpretive Description, seven occupational therapists were interviewed about their experiences supervising students with disabilities. Results: This presentation focuses on three themes: perceptions of disability, the complexities of disclosure, and tensions between being an educator and being an OT. Preceptors were deeply committed to educating students, yet distrusted accommodations provided to students, in part because the occupational and environmental demands of the site were rarely taken into account. This distrust also fueled perceptions of students with disabilities as a safety risk or conversely, as in need of protection. Conclusions: Clearer attention to environment and occupation in fieldwork sites could lower the distrust. At the same time educational programs could work with preceptors on aspects of pedagogy for greater clarity on learning objectives and standards, while implementing accommodations.


T80 Evaluating psychoeducational apps for military members with acute concussions
Thursday (CST| HSC): 13:30-13:55 | Poster presentation
Rehabilitation | Community/population

Chelsea Jones (Heroes in Mind Advocacy and Research Consortium (HiMARC), University of Alberta | Edmonton) cweiman@ualberta.ca, Katilin O'Toole University of Alberta kvotoole@ualberta.ca, Suzette Bremault-Phillips Heroes in Mind Advocacy and Research Consortium (HiMARC), University of Alberta suzette2@ualberta.ca

Introduction: Military personnel have an elevated risk of sustaining mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) and post-concussion symptoms (PCS; Garber, Rusu, & Zamorski, 2014). Smartphone apps that provide psychoeducation may assist those with mTBI or PCS to overcome the unique barriers that military personnel experience with accessing healthcare resources. Objective: (1) to evaluate the smartphone apps advertised to provide psychoeducation for those who have sustained a mTBI or PCS utilizing the Mobile Application Rating Scale (MARS; Stoyanov et al. 2015) and; (2) explore the relevance, utility and effectiveness of these apps to facilitate symptom management, return to duty, and overall recovery from mTBIs amongst military personnel. Method: A systematic search for smartphone apps for military members with mTBI or PCS was conducted on June 21, 2019. Apps meeting inclusion criteria were evaluated using the MARS and compared to evidence-based best-practice management protocols for mTBI and PCS. Results: The search yielded a total of 324 smartphone apps. After applying inclusion/exclusion criteria, 26 apps were subjected to evaluation. One app was endorsed by Veteran Affairs; all others (n= 25) were developed for civilians. Once compared to evidence-based best-practice resources, the majority of the apps provided adequate psychoeducational content. Conclusion: Maximizing full recovery after mTBI is critical to maintaining a fit, ready military force. Psychoeducational interventions have a good evidence-base as a treatment for mTBIs and PCS. Utilizing apps for this purpose may be clinically effective, confidential, easily accessible, and cost-effective.


S51 Environmental impacts on workplace participation of young people with disabilities
Thursday (CST| HSC): 14:00-14:25 | Poster presentation
Participation and inclusion | Child/youth

Saeideh Shahin (McGill University | Montreal) saeideh.shahinvarnousfaderany@mail.mcgill.ca, Meaghan Reitzel McMaster University reitzelm@mcmaster.ca, Briano DiRezze McMaster University direzzbm@mcmaster.ca, Sara Ahmed McGill University sara.ahmed@mcgill.ca, Dana Anaby McGill University dana.anaby@mcgill.ca

Introduction: The participation and engagement in work-related activities of transition-aged youths with disabilities is limited. Objective: To synthesize existing knowledge on the impact of the environment on workplace participation of transition-aged youths and young adults with brain-based disabilities. Methods: A scoping review of peer-reviewed studies that explored the environmental impact on work participation among youths aged 18-35 and published from1995 to 2018 was conducted. Findings were categorized into four environmental domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF); Products and technology & natural environment, Supports and relationships, Attitudes, and Services, systems and policies. Results: Thirty-one articles, both qualitative and quantitative, met the inclusion criteria. All aspects of the ICF environmental domains had an impact on the workplace participation of youths with a variety of brain-based disabilities (e.g., spina bifida, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, intellectual disability, traumatic brain injury). The majority of the studies (77%) highlighted the importance of services, supports and policies at the institutional level, without clear strategies to overcome existing barriers. Sixty-eight percent of the studies explored the impact of social support from family, friends, employers and colleagues, 55% discussed the importance of a physically accessible workspace and assistive technology, and 11% focused on attitudes of colleagues and employers on workplace participation. Conclusion: Findings support the need for interventions at the institutional level. Partnering with stakeholders (e.g., employers, policymakers) is key to jointly reduce environmental barriers and reinforce supports, identified in this review, to improve participation and employment outcomes among transition-aged youths with brain-based disabilities.


T58C CAOT-QC
Thursday (CST| HSC): 14:00-14:25 | Paper presentation
|

France Verville (CAOT-Qc) fverville@caot.ca

Join staff from CAOT chapters who will discuss highlights of the past year, plans for the upcoming year and respond to questions about the chapter model of regional-national representation.

Venez rejoindre le personnel des chapitres de l’ACE qui discutera des points saillants de l’année passée, des projets pour l’année à venir et répondra aux questions sur le modèle de chapitre de représentation régionale/nationale.


T74 Turning points and resiliency processes following TBI: Preliminary insights?
Thursday (CST| HSC): 14:00-14:25 | Paper presentation
Participation and inclusion | Adult

Rona Macdonald (University of Toronto | Toronto) rona.macdonald@mail.utoronto.ca, Anne Hunt University of Toronto anne.hunt@utoronto.ca, Laura Hartman Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital LHartman@hollandbloorview.ca, Gillian King University of Toronto gking27@uwo.ca, Emily Nalder University of Toronto emily.nalder@utoronto.ca,

Introduction: Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a leading cause of disability worldwide, and for many individuals, living with TBI involves reconstructing their sense of self, and changing their beliefs about what gives meaning to their life. Resiliency (adaptation to life challenges) may help to explain how these changes occur, yet the factors fostering resiliency after TBI are poorly understood. Resiliency may be fostered by features of the broader environment, supportive networks/services, in conjunction with individual characteristics. Objectives: To offer some preliminary insights into resiliency after TBI from the Turning Points Study, and to trace out possible implications for OT practice/research. Approach: Framed around turning points, a qualitative study drawing on arts-based methods (body-mapping) and interviews, and involving adults living with a TBI and their caregivers/care-partners, is breaking new ground in the field by exploring resiliency after TBI. Results: Results will be presented to highlight turning points influencing how individuals adapt following TBI, and the factors that fostered resiliency at these junctures. Three provisional insights into how resiliency is understood following TBI and the implications for OT practice and research will be presented and discussed. Conclusions: Consistent with enablement and strength-based approaches in OT, understanding the factors involved in resiliency following TBI could help to identify new rehabilitation intervention targets that may assist individuals and families adapt to living with the impacts of TBI.


T75 Do no harm: Thinking clearly about our role in education
Thursday (CST| HSC): 14:00-14:25 | Paper presentation
Education | Community/population

Lynn Lundell (Attic Therapy | Prince Albert) attictherapy@sasktel.net

Introduction: Occupational therapists work with clients to overcome barriers to meaningful engagement in human occupation. When occupational therapists have been invited to work in the education sector, this paradigm has generally been applied to the student. However, this reasoning accepts a premise that requires the student, rather than the education system, to undergo change, in pursuit of “inclusion.” Objectives: This presentation argues that occupational therapists, when invited to work within the education sector, are well positioned to team with educators to understand students as able, rather than as needing remediation of disability. In this presentation, the client is considered to be the educator, and the occupational performance challenge is inclusive education. Methods: This presentation will describe an approach that has been created using this premise, and how this shift has changed inclusive practices in unexpected ways within a multidisciplinary intensive supports team. Practice Implications: Occupational therapists are often presented with unrealistic and unsustainable caseloads, especially in school-based practice. Changing our view of who the client is can make our role more congruent and effective. It will also support decision makers in perceiving us not as adjunctive health care providers, but essential members of an education team. Conclusion: As long as therapists within the education sector continue to assess and treat students, rather than supporting educators in tackling their occupational performance challenges, we continue to compete with and disempower potential clients, and we interfere with their ability to help the children who desperately need their role in providing education to all.


S1 “Opened My Eyes”: Learning from interprofessional engagement with Indigenous communities
Thursday (CST| HSC): 14:30-14:55 | Paper presentation
Education | Non-specific to Client Group

Lisa Mendez (University of Manitoba | Winnipeg) lisa.mendez@umanitoba.ca, Cara L. Brown University of Manitoba cara.brown@umanitoba.ca, Nichol Marsch

Introduction: There is a considerable health disparity between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples due to the legacy of colonization. To address this disparity, future health care professionals need to have the skills to provide culturally safe interprofessional care. A Canadian university has partnered with rural and remote Indigenous communities to provide students with a two-week interprofessional service-learning experience. Objectives: To explore student perspectives of how this two-week experience enhanced their skills, knowledge and behaviors related to interprofessional collaboration and working well with Indigenous communities. Methods: A qualitative design using interpretive description was used to explore student learning. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with 9 students representing 6 professions, and member-checking was completed. Inductive analysis consisted of 3 researchers coding independently and then coming together to discuss discrepancies and develop themes. Results: The “Immersive Experience” of working with the Indigenous communities “Opened Students’ Eyes” to the effects of colonization, and the resilience and strengths of Indigenous communities. Students were confronted with their positionality which supported “Developing Cultural Competency”. Students learned about “Building Trusting Relationships” and its importance in working with Indigenous communities and with other professions. Students came away from the experience with a stronger understanding of their place in working with Indigenous communities, and on interprofessional teams, thus “Finding Their Place”. Conclusion: An immersive interprofessional experience within Indigenous communities can provide a rich opportunity to learn about the impact of colonization, the importance of cultural safety, and to develop skills for building trusting relationships with interprofessional teams and communities.


T2 Technology use to assess social isolation among senior citizens
Thursday (CST| HSC): 14:30-14:55 | Paper presentation
Education | Older Adult

Karishma Patel (University of Toronto | Toronto) p.thakkar@mail.utoronto.ca, Shahrose Aratia University of Toronto shahrose.aratia@mail.utoronto.ca, Priyanka Thakkar University of Toronto p.thakkar@mail.utoronto.ca, Shehroz Khan University of Toronto shehroz.khan@uhn.ca, Rosalie Wang University of Toronto rosalie.wang@utoronto.ca,

Introduction. Aging is a transitional process as individuals experience role changes which may lead to limited social networks (Cornwell, Laumann, & Schumm, 2008). Engagement in social interactions is an important occupation, and loss of this can contribute to social isolation. Tools to detect and measure social isolation need to be created to understand this phenomenon among senior citizens. Benefits of using a technological tool includes minimizing self-report bias, providing continuous measurements and increasing ecological validity. Objectives. The aim of this study is to understand the frequency of social interactions of senior citizens, their perception and experiences regarding social isolation, and their acceptance of technology. Methods. This concurrent nested, mixed methods study requires participants to complete a survey regarding social interaction, social isolation, and technology use/acceptability. An optional telephone interview will be conducted to elaborate on survey responses. Inclusion criteria are being 55 years or older, community-dwelling, fluency in English, and residing in Canada. Participants will be recruited via emails sent through the AGE-WELL Network. 100 survey and 8 telephone responses are anticipated. Survey data will be analyzed using SPSS Statistics (V26). Practice Implications. Findings will provide insight for occupational therapists and healthcare professionals on the senior citizen experience of social isolation, which can guide interventions. Understanding the degree of acceptability of technological tools can benefit researchers and developers in creating assessment tools to detect social isolation. Conclusions. Information gathered will allow for greater understanding of seniors’ experiences and be used to inform development of technological tools to assess social isolation.


T81 Research-based theatre: The experiences of disabled people in healthcare professions
Thursday (CST| HSC): 14:30-14:55 | Paper presentation
Advocacy /policy development | Adult

Tal Jarus (University of British Columbia | Vancouver) tal.jarus@ubc.ca, George Belliveau University of British Columbia, Yael Mayer University of British Columbia, Christopher Cook University of British Columbia, Laura Yvonne Bulk University of British Columbia, Michael Lee University of British Columbia, Laen Hershler University of British Columbia, Scott Button University of British Columbia, Hila Graf University of British Columbia, Jennica Nichols University of British Columbia

Rationale: Healthcare has the lowest representation of workers with disabilities, suggesting that unaccommodating systems may be more prevalent in this sector than in others. Based on the literature, the main barriers students and clinicians with disabilities are facing are attitudes towards disability, stigma, lack of appropriate policies, and lack of knowledge of how to accommodate in the healthcare system. Objective: In our recent work, we used the innovative method Research-Based Theatre, involving healthcare educators, staff and students, change-makers, employers and employees, and the general public, to facilitate attitudinal change and reshape policy in support of people with disabilities. Method: To present the lived experiences of students and clinicians with disabilities, we have produced a play based on our existing data. This play, called Alone in the Ring, displays the lived experience of students and clinicians with disabilities in healthcare professions. Within this presentation, we will describe our work process, starting with the raw data of interviews into playwriting and creating a scene that was then shared with the audience and was further developed. Practice implications: A theatrical production offers a unique approach to translate critical findings by bringing to life the humanity that lies at the core of the research. It is an accessible form of knowledge translation to a broad audience, that allows presenting on stage the barriers to inclusion based on lived experiences. Conclusions: Research-based theatre is an innovative approach to promote social change, inclusion, and equity for people with disabilities.


T82 Lessons learned by clinical educators in a student-led clinic
Thursday (CST| HSC): 14:30-14:55 | Paper presentation
Education | Child/youth

Anne Hunt (University of Toronto | Toronto) anne.hunt@utoronto.ca, Nick Reed University of Toronto nick.reed@utoronto.ca, Dayna Greenspoon Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital dgreenspoon@hollandbloorview.ca

Introduction. As demands grow for occupational therapy clinical educators, there is a need for efficient models of student supervision. Student-led clinics provide opportunities to train multiple students simultaneously. However, there is limited information to guide clinicians in how best to supervise multiple students in non-traditional settings. Objectives. To describe how three occupational therapists worked together to support clinical education of interprofessional students in a pediatric concussion student-led clinic. Methods. A co-autoethnographic approach was used to explore the experiences of the occupational therapists and to identify insights about supervision in the clinic where two supervisors managed three to five students simultaneously. Data from the occupational therapists’ fieldnotes, weekly discussions, and program evaluation were collected. Thematic analysis was used to identify dominant themes. Results. The overarching theme that reflected clinical supervision in the student-led clinic was cultivating a safe, accessible culture that supported students to learn with and from fellow students and supervisors. Specific strategies used by supervisors were: 1) identifying and building on student’s individual strengths; 2) ensuring direct access to supervisors; 3) using daily group ‘huddles’ to discuss operational issues, and client care; and, 4) intentional development of programming to enable students at different skill levels to ‘take the lead’ in a variety of responsibilities. Supervisors needed to have keen observation skills, flexibility, patience, enthusiasm and an ability to foster supportive, strengths-based communication. Conclusions. Supervision of multiple students simultaneously in a student-led clinic is accomplished through establishing a safe, accessible culture and intentional use of strategies and skills.


T83 Clinical reasoning for implementing evidence-based practices for self-awareness retraining
Thursday (CST| HSC): 14:30-14:55 | Paper presentation
Rehabilitation | Adult

Valérie Poulin (Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières | Trois-Rivières) valerie.poulin@uqtr.ca, Marc-André Pellerin Université Laval marc-andre.pellerin.1@ulaval.ca, Marie-Ève Lamontagne Université Laval Marie-Eve.Lamontagne@fmed.ulaval.ca, Anabelle Viau-Guay Université Laval anabelle.Viau-Guay@fse.ulaval.ca, Sandrine Gagné-Trudel Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières Sandrine.Gagne-Trudel@uqtr.ca,

Introduction: The cognitive rehabilitation of individuals with self-awareness deficits is challenging and represents an important area for practice improvement [1-3]. Recent evidence supports the use of self-awareness retraining for improving activity and participation outcomes, such as verbal and videotaped feedback, guided discussion, metacognitive strategy training, and education[4]. However, little is known about the implementation of these clinical practices, as well as the occupational therapists (OTs)’ reasoning while implementing them. Objectives: To explore clinicians’ reasoning while implementing evidence-based practices for self-awareness retraining. Methods: Ten clinicians (n=6 OTs, 3 neuropsychologists, 1 educator) from one stroke rehabilitation team participated in a knowledge translation intervention, which consisted of provision of learning tools (videos, pocket cards) and an interactive workshop. Clinical reasoning for implementing these practices was documented through semi-structured interviews using chart simulated recall methodology (3 months post-intervention) and a focus group (6 months). Transcribed verbatim were analyzed using the Framework method[5-6]. Results: The most frequently used intervention components were verbal feedback and guided discussion (n=5/10 participants). The selection and adaptation of these individualized interventions were described as a complex, iterative and interactive process influenced by various factors related to clients (e.g., cognitive/communication skills, emotional readiness, therapy engagement, expected functional outcomes); clinicians (e.g., self-confidence, previous experiences/practices); tasks and training conditions (e.g., repetition/variability, duration, performance predictability); and practice context (e.g., inter-professional collaboration, organizational constraints). Conclusions: Multiple factors related to clinicians, clients, and context influence reasoning when implementing self-awareness retraining and need to be considered to foster practice implementation in this challenging area of cognitive rehabilitation.


S25 Rehabilitation services for children and families living in rural areas
Thursday (CST| HSC): 15:30-15:55 | Poster presentation
Rehabilitation | Child/youth

Paulina Finak (Queen's University | Kingston) 18pmf@queensu.ca, Carrie Davis Queen's University 13cd54@queensu.ca, Kelsi Herder Queen's University 18klh1@queensu.ca, Beata Batorowicz Queen's University beata.batorowicz@queensu.ca

Rationale: Children with disabilities who live in rural areas face unique challenges to accessing rehabilitation therapy services, including occupational therapy (Gallego, 2017; National Disability Services Victoria, 2011). However, our knowledge about these services and the particular challenges and gaps is scarce. Objectives: The objectives of this study were to: a) summarize research on rehabilitation services provided in the rural areas of middle- to high- income countries for children (ages 0-21) with disabilities and their families, b) explore benefits and challenges of these services, and c) identify gaps in services. Methods: We conducted a scoping review, which involved a systematic search of electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsychINFO). A total of 4,863 articles were retrieved. Three authors completed screening of these articles using Covidence and following a systematic, independent review process. The title and abstract screening yield 249 studies that were reviewed in full-text and finally 53 studies met inclusion criteria. We used data-charting to extract the information relevant to the review’s objectives. Subsequently, we will collate these data and summarize into themes. Practice Implications: Data analysis is in progress. Findings will inform our understanding of the specific benefits, challenges and gaps in rehabilitation services available to children with disabilities and their families who live in rural areas. A particular focus will be on occupational therapy. Conclusions: This scoping review will inform future research, practice and policy with relevance to provision of occupational therapy services in rural areas.


S64 Beyond the lab: Nature as resource for OT education
Thursday (CST| HSC): 15:30-15:55 | Paper presentation
Participation and inclusion | Older Adult

Katie Lee Bunting (University of British Columbia | Vancouver) katie.leebunting@ubc.ca, Jocelyn Micallef, Gabriel Smith, Diana Jung, Natasha Moore, Patty Hambler

Rationale: As occupational therapists (OT) we know the importance of the environment on occupational engagement. Research on the effects of learning in nature for K-12 students has identified multiple benefits. There is less research exploring the effects of learning in nature for post-secondary students, a paucity of research on health profession and graduate students’ experiences, and no research on student OTs’ experiences. Objectives: This study had two research questions: (1) how does learning in nature affect graduate occupational therapy students’ self-regulation, academic buoyancy, and sense of connection to nature, campus, and their peers?; and (2) what are students’ experiences of learning in nature? Methods: (1) 16 students completed pretest, posttest measures. Paired t-tests were used for analysis. (2) Using a descriptive qualitative approach, nine students completed face-to-face semi-structured interviews. Inductive thematic analysis was used. Results: (1) There was a significant increase in measures of state mindfulness (p< 0.001) and academic buoyancy (p = 0.046); a significant decrease in perceptions of peer cooperation (p = 0.045). (2) Themes emerged on the regulating effects of nature, enhanced learning and engagement, connections to peers and place, and wanting to learn in nature more often. Conclusions: These findings are in line with the breadth of literature on the positive impacts nature has on K-12 student learning, engagement, health, and well-being. While traditional learning spaces continue to hold value in OT education, we must challenge ourselves to “do” education beyond traditional settings and view nature as a resource in OT education.


T61 Recovery and equine assisted learning programs in forensic mental health
Thursday (CST| HSC): 15:30-15:55 | Poster presentation
Mental health | Adult

Amanda Messina (University of Toronto | Toronto) amanda.messina@mail.utoronto.ca, Emma Collingwood University of Toronto emma.collingwood@mail.utoronto.ca, Theresa Bernard The Centre Addiction and Mental Health theresa.bernard@camh.ca, Amanda Dam The Centre Addiction and Mental Health amandaldam@gmail.com, Lynn Cockburn University of Toronto l.cockburn@utoronto.ca, Stephanie Penney The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

Introduction: Adults in the forensic mental health system experience barriers to recovery and lack opportunities for engagement in meaningful occupations. Equine assisted interventions have the potential to enable forensic mental health patients to learn new skills and develop social relationships, and can be part of occupational therapy programs. However, the research on equine assisted therapies in forensic mental health settings, including those by occupational therapists, is limited and the influence of equine assisted interventions on recovery in this context is unknown. Objectives: The aim of this descriptive qualitative study was to gather forensic mental health patient and staff experiences of an equine assisted learning program and to explore different aspects of the program that facilitate recovery.?? Methods: 12 forensic mental health patients and 12 forensic mental health staff at a psychiatric facility involved with an equine assisted learning program were invited to participate in qualitative, in-person interviews. Thematic analysis of the interview transcripts was used to discover themes related to recovery.? Practice Implications: Studying the experiences of patient and staff participants in an equine assisted learning program in relation to recovery promotes the development and implementation of similar programs across mental health populations. Further, it provides evidence for the role of occupation in recovery to guide occupational therapists and other health professions in facilitating recovery with their patients. The results provide support and caveats for occupational therapists who wish to develop similar programs. Conclusions: This study provides insight into the perspectives of forensic mental health patients and staff on an equine assisted learning program and how the program could be contributing to recovery.


T90 Facilitators’ strategies for digital storytelling by persons with dementia
Thursday (CST| HSC): 15:30-15:55 | Paper presentation
Participation and inclusion | Older Adult

Kara Hollinda (University of Alberta | Saskatoon/Edmonton) kara.hollinda@saskhealthauthority.ca, Christine Daum University of Alberta cdaum@ualberta.ca, Adriana Rios Rincon University of Alberta aros@ualberta.ca, Arlene Astell University of Toronto arlene.astell@utoronto.ca, Lili Liu University of Waterloo lili.liu@uwaterloo.ca,

Introduction: Digital storytelling is the process of a facilitator and an individual collaborating to co-create a narrative in the form of a short video. Digital storytelling has been used to create legacy pieces for older adults, including those living with dementia. Facilitators of digital storytelling come from a variety of professional backgrounds, but little has been published about the specific strategies that facilitators use. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine strategies of three facilitators during digital storytelling with older adults living with dementia in a multi-site project, taking into consideration the facilitators’ disciplines. Methods: Audio recordings of digital storytelling co-creation sessions in Edmonton, Vancouver, and Toronto were transcribed and subjected to qualitative content analysis. Facilitators came from occupational therapy, biomedical engineering and adult education, and psychology backgrounds. Results: Regardless of discipline, facilitators implemented similar communication strategies to elicit story sharing. Facilitators used similar approaches across sites to build relationships and collaborate with participants throughout sessions. Each facilitator demonstrated an understanding of dementia that enabled flexibility and adaptation in the moment to meet a participant’s strengths and needs. Each facilitator utilized strategies and ways of relating that were unique to the participants in their site. Conclusion: Facilitators from different disciplines demonstrated individualistic approaches for each participant, while using similar communication strategies and relational skill sets across sites during digital storytelling with older adults living with dementia.


T92 Exploring occupational transitions of Syrian refugee youth to Canada
Thursday (CST| HSC): 15:30-15:55 | Paper presentation
Participation and inclusion | Child/youth

Sumaira Khan (University of Toronto | Toronto) sumaira.khan@mail.utoronto.ca, Zahra Kanji University of Toronto zahra.kanji@mail.utoronto.ca, Katherine Stewart Western University, Jane Davis University of Toronto

Introduction: Since 2015, Canada has resettled more than 40,000 Syrian refugees who have fled the civil war. This forced migration journey may present significant disruptions for Syrian refugees’ everyday lives, particularly for refugee youth. Refugee youth may experience distinct changes in their typical activities and roles, such as schooling and caring for family (Mayne et al., 2016; Suleman & Whiteford, 2013). To date, exploration of the experiences of Syrian refugee youths’ occupational transitions to Canada is largely absent. Objective: This study aims to explore the experiences of occupational transition among Syrian refugee youth who have resettled in Canada. Methods: Drawing on an occupational perspective, this narrative inquiry study will explore refugee youths’ first-hand accounts of their experiences of transition from Syria to Canada. Two semi-structured interviews incorporating a co-created occupational life course timeline will be conducted with eight Syrian refugee youth between 16 and 24 years of age, recruited through three Ontario refugee services programs. Generated narratives will be thematically analyzed to explore how the participants’ occupations have evolved through the resettlement journey and how participants make meaning of their experiences of occupational transition. Results: It is anticipated that the findings will highlight youth’s significant struggles and small successes with navigating their educational and work transitions, providing support to younger siblings and parents, and developing new leisure pursuits while maintaining family and cultural traditions. Conclusion: Developing a nuanced understanding of the occupational needs of Syrian refugee youth will support the creation and delivery of meaningful, culturally sensitive, client-centred, occupation-based services.


F4 Identifying the psychosocial needs of tenants living in social housing
Friday (CST| HSC): 08:30-08:55 | Paper presentation
Advocacy /policy development | Community/population

Carrie Anne Marshall (Western University | London) carrie.marshall@uwo.ca, Abrial Cooke Western University acooke24@uwo.ca, Suliman Aryobi 16sa34@queensu.ca, Roxanne Isard Western University risard2@uwo.ca, Abe Oudshoorn Western University aoudshoo@gmail.com, Rebecca Gewurtz McMaster University gewurtz@mcmaster.ca, Fiona Drake City of Kingston fdrake@cityofkingston.ca, Sarah Campbell London & Middlesex Community Housing scampbell@lmhc.ca, Deborah Firmin City of Brantford dfirmin@brantford.ca

Introduction: The number of individuals with complex mental illness and substance use challenges in social housing appears to be growing, with many living with unmet basic needs. Knowledge of the unique needs of tenants can prepare occupational therapists to more effectively address health and social inequities in this population. Objectives: To present the findings of a scoping review exploring the psychosocial needs of tenants living in social housing in Canada. Methods: We conducted a scoping review using the Arksey and O’Malley (2005) framework. We designed, translated, and deployed a search in the following databases: EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychInfo, Medline, Sociological Abstracts, Proquest Dissertations and Theses, and Nursing and Allied Health Database. We also conducted a grey literature search of the webpages of social housing organizations and policy documents. Results: Two independent raters screened 4969 citations following the removal of duplicates, and 107 articles were subjected to a full-text review. A total of nine peer-reviewed studies and four articles retrieved during our grey literature search were included. These articles implore policy-makers to recognize the challenging landscape of social housing—and the need to provide supports tailored specifically to those living with mental illness and substance use challenges in social housing in Canada. Conclusions: Occupational therapists frequently support those living with mental illness and substance use challenges who are living in poverty. Recognizing social housing as context characterized by health and social inequities can help occupational therapists contribute to the identification of approaches for more effectively addressing tenants’ unmet needs.


F7 Historical analysis of occupational therapy in public health, 1914-2019
Friday (CST| HSC): 08:30-08:55 | Paper presentation
General/professional issues | Non-specific to Client Group

Katie Lewis (University of Toronto | Toronto) michelle.lehman@mail.utoronto.ca, Michelle Lehman University of Toronto michelle.lehman@mail.utoronto.ca, Lynn Cockburn University of Toronto l.cockburn@utoronto.ca

Introduction: It is clearly established in occupational therapy literature that the field is well suited to collaborate with the public health sector due to overlapping views of health and well-being. However, there has been relatively little collaboration between these professions. Histories of both Canadian occupational therapy and public health sectors have been conducted, yet little has been examined as to why these fields remain distinct. Objective: This study examines the events that have led to the present-day separation of occupational therapy and public health. Approach: A qualitative critical discourse analysis of historical texts was employed to understand the factors leading to the separation of these fields. Scholarly, archival, and grey literature pertaining to the development of public health and/or occupational therapy was collected from archives, online databases, and libraries. Textual data was analyzed using critical discourse analysis to examine the societal contexts surrounding the texts. Results: Preliminary results have demonstrated an overarching theme of power dynamics within Canadian healthcare. As occupational therapy transitioned from a wartime position to emphasizing membership in medically oriented healthcare teams, the field appeared to have relied on physicians to advocate for it. Since then, occupational therapists have consistently advocated for expanded roles, in health promotion and occupational engagement in public health initiatives, with seemingly little reciprocity. As a result, there have been few avenues for collaboration. Conclusions: By gaining an understanding of the factors that influenced occupational therapy in relation to public health, we hope to provide a knowledge base to draw upon in future efforts for collaboration.


T26 Worker acceptance and usability of a new cargo management system
Friday (CST| HSC): 08:30-08:55 | Poster presentation
Environment | Community/population

Jessica Murphy (University of Alberta | Calgary, AB) jmurphy2@ualberta.ca, Avneet Chohan University of Alberta akchohan@ualberta.ca, Lili Liu University of Alberta lili.liu@ualberta.ca, Adriana Rios Rincon University of Alberta aros@ualberta.ca, Antonio Miguel Cruz University of Alberta miguelcr@ualberta.ca

Introduction. There are several cargo management systems that assist in the loading and unloading of portable ladders from service vehicles with differing degrees of acceptability and usability. A new cargo management system, the RazerLift, is both powered and automated to better assist workers with ladder lifting tasks. Objectives. Determine the technology acceptance and usability of a powered and automated cargo management system by workers who need to lift ladders as part of their daily duties, compared to a mechanical cargo management system. Methods. One-way repeated measures design. Each participant (n=12, ongoing study) completed a ladder lifting task in two conditions, with a powered and automated cargo management system and with a mechanical cargo management system. We measured the time (seconds) that unloading and loading of the ladders took using each cargo management system. Questionnaires were administered for each condition in order to determine participants’ acceptance and usability of each cargo management system. Results. The combined unloading and loading time in using the powered and automated system was significantly lower (mean=52.35, SD=4.23) compared with the mechanical system (mean=88.12, SD=13.95; t=-5.21, p=0.006). Questionnaire results indicated higher acceptance and usability for the powered and automated system (mean=42.40, SD=5.55) compared to the mechanical system (mean=29.00, SD=6.66; Z=-2.04, p=0.041). Conclusions. Ladder lifting work using the powered and automated cargo management system was more time efficient. Participants preferred to use the powered and automated cargo management system over the mechanical system. These findings support workers’ acceptance and usability for this type of system.


F3 Your building. Our future
Friday (CST| HSC): 08:30-09:25 | Extended discussion
Environment | Non-specific to Client Group

Marco Pasqua (Rick Hansen Foundation | Richmond, BC) mshalinsky@rickhansen.com

Introduction: 30% of Canadian adults — that is 9 million people! — consider accessibility when deciding which businesses to visit. 57% of people with disabilities who do not work believe they could if barriers were removed, allowing more than half a million Canadians to find meaningful employment for your clients. This Accessibility Certification is the only national program that rates and certifies the built environment on its level of meaningful access, ensuring everyone has access to the places where we live, work, learn, and play. Objectives: After attending the workshop, the participant will be able to … 1) Realize the economic and societal benefits of ensuring that the built environment is accessible for all. 2) Develop a strong understanding of Universal Design and how it is applied 3) Acquire a strong understanding of Meaningful Access and why it is important 4) Deepen awareness of accessibility accessible features and recognize barriers in the built environment. Practice Implications or Results: This session will leave you understanding the critical role you play in accessing the built environment, along with practical information on how you can promote accessible spaces for everyone, everywhere. Conclusion: Imagine being able to promote an environment where your clients can reach their full potential. Interventions can only be effective in spaces where there are no barriers - Are you ready for the future?


F6 Développer les capacités des écoles pour soutenir l’inclusion des élèves présentant un trouble du spectre de l’autisme
Friday (CST| HSC): 08:30-09:25 | Extended discussion
Participation and inclusion | Child/youth

Emilie Rajotte (Université Laval | Quebec) emilie.rajotte@fmed.ulaval.ca, Marie Grandisson Université Laval marie.grandisson@fmed.ulaval.ca, Christine Hamel Université Laval christine.hamel@fse.ulaval.ca, Julie Godin CIUSSS Capitale-Nationale julie.godin@fmed.ulaval.ca, Mélanie Couture Université de Sherbrooke Melanie.M.Couture@USherbrooke.ca, Myriam Chrétien-Vincent Université Laval myriam.chretien-vincent.1@ulaval.ca

Problématique : L’inclusion des élèves présentant un trouble du spectre de l’autisme (TSA) en classe ordinaire engendre du stress pour plusieurs enseignants qui ne se sentent pas suffisamment préparés et soutenus pour faciliter la participation de ces élèves (Cappe et al., 2016). Peu de lignes directrices sont disponibles pour les ergothérapeutes qui souhaitent soutenir le personnel scolaire travaillant auprès des élèves présentant un TSA, dont les défis diffèrent souvent de ceux de leurs pairs. Le projet Pour des écoles inclusives TSA intègre les bonnes pratiques en scolaire et dans le domaine de l’autisme. Il propose un processus d’intervention structuré dans lequel l’ergothérapeute accompagne un groupe d’intervenants scolaires pour adapter les environnements, activités et routines pour faciliter la participation de tous les élèves incluant ceux qui présentent un TSA. Objectifs : À la fin de cette conférence, les participants vont : 1) être familiers avec le projet Pour des écoles inclusives TSA et 2) avoir réfléchi à son applicabilité dans différents contextes. Approche : La présentation portera sur : a) le processus d’intervention structuré de Pour des écoles inclusives TSA et b) l’outil visuel basé sur les évidences scientifiques qui a été développé pour soutenir l’ergothérapeute dans l’accompagnement des intervenants scolaires dans l’identification des adaptations à l’école au niveau de l’environnement, des activités et des routines. Les participants pourront ensuite partager leurs points de vue sur comment ils pourraient utiliser Pour des écoles inclusives: TSA dans leur contexte. Implications cliniques : c’est une opportunité pour les ergothérapeutes de réfléchir à leur rôle en lien avec la participation des élèves présentant un TSA en contexte scolaire. Conclusion : les ergothérapeutes peuvent considérer des actions pour développer les capacités des écoles pour créer des environnements, routines et activités plus inclusifs pour les élèves présentant un TSA.


T1 CAOT Practice Networks Supporting Your Practice
Friday (CST| HSC): 08:30-09:25 | Paper presentation
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Justine Jecker (CAOT Director of Professional Practice) jjecker@caot.ca

Many exciting changes with CAOT's Practice Networks have taken place over the past year, and we are excited to update you on these developments. This session will provide an overview of the networks and opportunities taking place nationally and regionally, and will aid occupational therapists in determining how their scope of practice may be better supported by joining one of our many practice networks. Practice Network Chairs will be in attendance to directly address specific questions. Following this session, nine of the CAOT Practice Networks will be hosting 25-minute orientation sessions between 10:30-10:55 and 11:00-11:25.


Occupational Justice for Newcomers Network (OJNN)
Friday (CST| HSC): 10:30-10:55 | Networking group
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Sara Abdo saraa@dal.ca Carla Giddings cgidding@uoguelph.ca

Come join members of the Occupational Justice for Newcomers Network (OJNN) to learn about the newest research on occupational therapy, migration and forced displacement. This is a 45-minute session for OJNN members, and anyone interested in learning more about occupational justice for asylum seekers, refugees, and newcomers. Bring a summary of your own research or a relevant study to share. Or bring your questions and insights to contribute to a lively conversation.


F27 Occupational Therapy and Vision Rehabilitation Network
Friday (CST| HSC): 10:30-10:55 | Networking group
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Julia Foster Julia.Foster@kingstonhsc.ca Laura Bulk laurabulk@gmail.com

The Occupational Therapy and Vision Rehabilitation Network (OTVRN) is a group of clinicians, educators, and researchers from across Canada who are interested in the development of occupational therapy involvement in the area of vision rehabilitation. The ultimate goal of the network is that all Canadians with vision loss will have equal access to quality occupational therapy services, both in the area of vision rehabilitation and other areas of practice. The network works on various initiatives in the areas of education, research, and advocacy, and is always looking to connect with occupational therapists interested in or curious about enhancing support for individuals with vision loss.


Global Health Practice Network
Friday (CST| HSC): 10:30-10:55 | Networking group
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Emmanuelle Pichard-Jolicoeur emmanuelle.pichard-jolicoeur.1@ulaval.ca

The Global Health Network wishes to permit occupational therapists and students throughout Canada to collaborate and share their experiences in global health and social inclusion. Its goal is therefore mainly to advance the promotion of occupational therapy with all populations, with respect to the quality of practice, ethics, understanding of the cultural, social, economic and political issues related to different contexts and countries, and the sustainability of actions and changes.


Suicide Prevention Network
Friday (CST| HSC): 10:30-10:55 | Networking group
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Kim Hewitt kimberleyhewitt@yahoo.ca Heather Vrbanac heather.vrbanac@gmail.com

The CAOT Network – Addressing Suicide in OT Practice strives to maintain OT representation across Canada and practice settings. Large group and smaller committee work completed by a dedicated group of OTs increases the identity and value of occupational therapists in suicide prevention in this country. Current committees include; curriculum committee, systems level committee, individual committee and a tool vetting committee. New members always welcome.


Occupational Therapy & Sexuality Practice Network
Friday (CST| HSC): 10:30-10:55 | Networking group
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Michelle Leclerc michelle.leclerc018@gmail.com

The Sexuality and Occupational Therapy Practice Network aims to provide its members with up to date resources in order to apply evidence-based practice for client needs regarding sex, reproductive health, safety, fertility, and many more aspects of sexuality following a diagnosis. We aim to provide a platform for members to share experiences, knowledge, and research on addressing sexuality in practice, as well as the opportunity to build the members’ capacities to help their clients live a meaningful, fulfilling life.


OT and Indigenous Health
Friday (CST| HSC): 11:00-11:25 | Networking group
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Kaarina Valavaara kjvalavaara@gmail.com Angie Phoenix angelaphenix@gmail.com Monique Luizon mlizonot@gmail.com

The Occupational Therapy and Indigenous Health network consists of CAOT members with an interest in building capacity, lobbying for occupational therapy services, and generating a greater discourse on occupational therapy and Indigenous Peoples’ health in Canada. The OTIHN is a volunteer group of Indigenous and settler occupational therapy clinicians, educators, researchers and students who work with the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists National Office staff to develop supports, resources and lobby efforts to build and promote occupational therapy services with Indigenous Peoples.


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